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Pipe: Aviation

Airlines halt Israel flights after attack

Tue, 2014-07-22 17:43
Cancellations after rockets fired from Gaza Strip landed within a mile of the airport come amid sensitivity after MH17 was shot down
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Airlines halt Israel flights after attack

Tue, 2014-07-22 17:43
Cancellations after rockets fired from Gaza Strip landed within a mile of the airport come amid sensitivity after MH17 was shot down
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Work on an ICAO global market-based measure begins to narrow down finer details of the Strawman

Tue, 2014-07-22 11:07
Tue 22 July 2014 - The design elements of a global market-based measure (GMBM) scheme to limit the growth of international emissions are slowly being pulled together by ICAO's Environmental Advisory Group (EAG). Set up in March, the EAG comprises 17 representatives from the governing ICAO Council, with participation from an industry representative, and works in parallel with a Global MBM Technical Task Force (GMTF), an ICAO CAEP sub-group. The EAG is now developing the principles and details of a carbon offset global scheme based on a Strawman approach drawn up by the ICAO Secretariat. Strawman Version 1.0 was presented to the EAG in March and after five meetings it has now progressed to Version 1.1. Its contents up till now have been restricted to EAG members, although a recent Council meeting has agreed to enhance the transparency of EAG activities and the Strawman to CAEP members, observers and experts.
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Honeywell UOP renewable jet fuel technology selected by Petrixo for large new Gulf biorefinery

Tue, 2014-07-22 05:07
Tue 22 July 2014 - Dubai-based Petrixo Oil & Gas has selected Honeywell UOP's renewable jet fuel process technology to produce renewable jet fuel and renewable diesel at a new refinery to be built in the nearby UAE emirate of Fujairah. The technology is expected to be capable of processing around 500,000 tonnes of renewable feedstocks, although the source or type of feedstock to be used has not been revealed. Petrixo announced earlier this year that it will invest $800 million to build the new refinery, which will have a design capacity of one million tonnes, and claims it will be the first commercial-scale renewable jet production facility outside of North America. The biorefinery is to be built on a 460,000 square metre area of land within the Fujairah Free Zone and the Port of Fujairah and is expected to produce a variety of biofuel products for the Gulf and international markets.
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British Airways A380 to feature in cross-industry initiative to study noise reduction procedures at Heathrow

Mon, 2014-07-21 18:06
Mon 21 July 2014 - Airbus, British Airways, Heathrow Airport and UK air navigation service provider NATS are to collaborate on an initiative to study and develop new operational procedures to reduce the number of people affected by aircraft noise around Heathrow. Using a British Airways Airbus A380, Airbus ProSky - the air traffic management subsidiary of Airbus - will design departure and arrival procedures based on recommendations from BA, NATS and the airport. Airbus EVP Customer Affairs Christopher Buckley said the A380 was the ideal aircraft to conduct the 'Quieter Flights' study as it had the latest state-of-the-art technologies that allowed optimised paths to be flown very precisely. Results of the project will be shared with the rest of the industry, including other airlines and airports, and Airbus engineers will later work on adapting the same changes to the rest of the Airbus fleet.
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Industry and green groups clash on the economic and climate impacts of UK runway expansion

Mon, 2014-07-21 15:02
Mon 21 July 2014 - A new report from the Confederation of British Industry (CBI) says action is needed to boost the UK's air links with emerging markets but this need not have to come at the expense of environmental commitments. It warns that without urgent and decisive action from politicians on the future of the UK’s airport infrastructure, businesses would miss out on the new connections they need, hampering efforts on trade and investment. However, another report from three UK green groups - RSPB, WWF and Aviation Environment Federation (AEF) - concludes plans to expand airport capacity are based on a "wing and a prayer" and the UK's climate targets cannot be met unless industry as a whole takes on the added costs that would result from having to make additional carbon savings if aviation emissions were allowed to soar. A further report on the UK's first four-year carbon budget period shows aviation emissions fell between 2008 and 2012.
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Speech - Aviation Weather

Mon, 2014-07-21 01:00
Assistant Administrator for NextGen Edward Bolton
Washington, DC

Good afternoon, and thank you, Ed [Bolen].

When an aviation group gathers, we often recount the birth of the industry on that sandy dune at Kitty Hawk. We know the details almost by heart: December 17, 1903. Two bicycle repairmen. The Wright Flyer. 120 feet in 12 seconds at 6 miles per hour. And just a few test flights later, the distance in the air was almost three football fields long. We see that famous photograph in our mind.

But there is a back story we dont often discuss. Years before that first flight, the Wrights had to undergo a search for a place to make history. They turned to the Weather Bureau for help. The Weather Bureau, which had set up an office in Kitty Hawk in 1875, told the Wrights that Kitty Hawk has a steady wind and a free sweep on the beachperfect conditions for their test flights. The conditions on December 13 were good for flightbut December 13 was a Sunday, and the Wrights werent going to defeat gravity on a Sunday. At 10:35 in the morning, four days later, the Wrights looked into a freezing headwind with gusts of wind the Weather Bureau had predicted and the brothers finally brokered a deal with gravity. When it came time to tell the world, the Wrights used a telegraph located conveniently at the Weather Bureau.

In the 111 years since then, the list of things that have changed about aviation gets pretty long. What we fly. When we fly. Where we fly. How long it takes. Engines. Radar. GPS. Fuel. Technology on the ground. Technology in the cockpit. Technology in space.

But every one of us would agree that there is one thing that hasnt changed a bit since Orville and Wilbur set aside bicycle repairand that is the weather. To us, Hows the weather? isnt a throwaway phrase. Its at the heart of the go/no-go. And it doesnt matter what youre flying, whether youre a wide-body or a Cub, Mother Nature requires respect and attentionbefore, during and even after the flight.

You know that, and thats why youre here. The FAA knows that, and thats why we take weather as seriously as we do. In a big operating environment, we wont take risks with safety. Neither do you.

The facts are plain. Weather is the single largest uncontrolled and uncontrollable user of the national airspace system. Based on our own Ops Net numbersover a decades worth of keeping trackbetter than two-thirds of all air traffic delays longer than 15 minutes were due to weather. Were all well aware of the safety considerations. But weather also causes deviations, delays, and ground stops. Thats lost time, and lost productivity.

I cant unveil a plan to change the weather, but I can tell you what were going to do about it. We launched a joint weather safety campaign with our GA partners in safety on May 1 in Alaskajust in time for the summer flying season. We already have more than a dozen partners, including many in this room --AOPA, NBAA, EAA and NOAA as well as NTSB. We have a simple premise: While terrain, model type and pilot experience may vary, the one thing that should unite all pilots is respect for the weather. The GA community recognizes that, and they were eager to join in. You realize this, and the size of this audience proves it.

Got Weather is an on-line resource that will run until the end of the year. We focus on a new topic each month. In June, we focused on turbulence. This month were looking at Flying IFR: knowing what youre flying into. And with summer flying that means thunderstorms. Im sure that will come up in the discussion of How Humans Deal with Uncertainty later today. Historically, weve seen pilots operating general aviation aircraft under VFR into Instrument Meteorological Conditions as a significant factor in fatal accidents. These events are known as VFR into IMC accidents.

As a result of collaborative safety initiatives, there has been reduction in these accidents. In fact, over the last 36 months only 4 percent of the general aviation fatal accidents have been caused by VFR into IMC.

But I think wed all agree that were still not where we want to be. AOPA confirms that nearly 75 percent of weather-related GA accidents are fatal.

The accident numbers have been stable over the last five years, but even at that, one is one too many.

Weve said from the beginning that what will lead us to success is the willingness of the GA community to step up.

I think what makes this work is that its common-sense remindersthe very kind of reminders that save lives. And were asking pilots to engage other pilots in the campaign.

This month, we ask pilots questions that bear repeating here: Are you proficient or just current? What's your qualification, experience and comfort level for flying in weather? Would training better prepare you for this flying season? How do you get weather information? What can you learn about weather? Have you reviewed weather minimums? Do you have an escape plan? Know and recognize your limits.

We also encourage pilots to write down personal minimums. The rationale is simple: it will serve as a personal, flexible safety buffer based on the pilots individual skills, training, currency and proficiency.

We also ask pilots to talk to fellow pilots, Certfieid Flight Instructors and FAA/Industry safety managers about weather decision-making wherever you are on the ramp or at the Pilot Lounge.

Were doing a lot on social media too Facebook and Twitter. Our Got Weather messages have reached 1.7 million people on social media. Our target audience is engaging with this content: 16,000 clicks, likes, shares, comments and video views.

I visited AOPA out in Frederick just last week. I couldnt be more pleased with their commitment to this campaign. Im proud of this campaign. Its one of our best. You can check it out at www.faa.gov/go/gotweather.

As we enter into the next generation of aviation, I think that NextGen is going to change the response to go/no-go questions like Hows the weather? Were deploying NextGen technologies into the national airspace system today. NextGen is now.

Take ADS-B.It gives GA a good idea of what the controllers see. In terms of situational awareness, theres a much better idea of the location of aircraft in the sky around them. Were not talking about something far down the road. Pilots already are seeing the additional benefits of ADS-B In better weather, traffic and situational awareness. We believe they will equip to enjoy these benefits. FIS-B FlightInformation ServiceBroadcastis a service that broadcasts graphical weather to the cockpit based on what ground-based weather radar sees. In addition, FIS-B broadcasts text-based advisories including Notice to Airmen messages and reports on everything from significant weather to thunderstorm activity.

NextGen is not unlike the electrical system in your house. Its largely invisible, but what it does for you is readily apparent. NextGen changes might not be seen by the flying public, but the passengers know all about the shorter flights, the fewer delays and fewer missed connections. As A4A will tell you, the carriers are saving minutes and fuel and slicing emissions. Thats all courtesy of more precise routing. GA and small aircraft operators get greater access to more airports across the country particularly during bad weather.

Working together pays off. As I said earlier, airplanes have changed, but aviation weather products well, not so much. Some of our weather products are eerily similar to the telegraph that the Wright Brothers used. As a matter of fact, if you looked at an area forecast from 1965 and another one from today well, suffice it to say that its hard to tell one from the other.

Thats why were working with the National Weather Service to transition the Area Forecast to digital and graphical alternatives. Weve taken a review of all weather information produced by the National Weather service for aviation purposes.

We want to improve the product in support of aviation weather. Were looking for opportunities to digitize products and services. Were going to identify products and services that are duplicative and let me say this about that: their days are numbered. As well they should be.

The Area Forecast is a manually generated text product with no graphical components. It forecasts VFR clouds and weather, and its issued four times a day. These things date back to the 1930s. The current version has not been changed since the early 1990s. It is the most labor intensive product that the National Weather Service puts out. Once we make the switch, this frees up weather forecasters to focus on the more relevant graphic and digital products used by general aviation.

So were already mapping alternative sources of information. Were going to provide guidance for using these alternatives. The General Aviation Joint Steering Committee, which brings together government and industry to advance safety, has endorsed this idea. Thats not surprising. Making a long story short an old, old story short were targeting early 2015 for transition to the alternative sources of information.

Were also working on a NextGen piece with our partners in industry and at the National Weather Service that bears mention here. Steve Brown of NBAA will be moderating a panel in just a bit and this will be addressed this in more detail. Were working to evolve the Convective Collaborative Forecast Product. Thats been the bread and butter for NAS planning by traffic managers over the past 15 years. Prior to the Convective Collaborative Forecasst Product, just about every stakeholder in the NAS had their own convective forecast. As this group is well aware, not having a common forecast made it difficult to build a strategic plan for the NAS.

But we are not done with the evolution of the Convective Collavoative Forecast Product. Science and technology advances have introduced new high-resolution forecasts like the Consolidated Storm Prediction for Aviation. And weather models are providing reliable probabilistic forecasts of convection. These improvements are still in development as potential alternatives to the Convective Collavoative Forecast Product. Further R&D is required.

NextGen calls for the use of probabilistic weather information for strategic planning. With the introduction of reliable weather information about thunderstorms, TFM planners can build a plan for the day that is based on the most likely weather scenario, as well as alternative plans to account for other potential weather scenarios.

This capability is critical for TFM planners to exploit new technology and procedures.

The Wright Brothers instinct was to pay attention to the weather. Their plan was to seek guidance, to work in partnership, to maximize their efforts. Were here today and tomorrow because their idea worked. But were also here because were following suit. Working in partnership maximizes our efforts. The Wrights made history with this approach. Lets do more of the same.

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Flight MH17 – facts and reactions

Fri, 2014-07-18 07:51
Malaysia Airlines flight MH17 was shot down on Thursday in east Ukraine killing all 298 people on board near the town of Torez in Donetsk province
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UK aviation group calls for government backing to kick-start production of sustainable aviation fuels

Fri, 2014-07-18 07:48
Fri 18 July 2014 - The potential to reduce UK aviation's annual carbon emissions by up to 1.7 million tonnes by 2030 through the uptake of sustainable aviation fuels can only be realised with government support, says UK industry environmental strategy group Sustainable Aviation (SA). It calls for a clear policy framework to stimulate investment and production of new generation alternative aviation fuels, which could provide up to £480 million ($820m) to the UK economy in 2030 and create 4,400 jobs if 12 new plants were to be built. Backed up by a parallel report from sustainable energy consultancy E4tech, SA has published a discussion paper, Fuelling the Future, outlining the potential market penetration both in the UK and globally for sustainable alternative fuels up to 2050. It is seeking views from policymakers and stakeholders ahead of a roadmap it intends publishing later in the year.
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Airbus trumps rivals at Farnborough

Thu, 2014-07-17 14:55
Airbus secures deals with airlines and leasing groups for 496 passenger jets worth $75bn. Boeing obtained orders and commitments for 201 aircraft worth $40bn
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Airbus trumps rivals at Farnborough

Thu, 2014-07-17 14:55
Airbus secures deals with airlines and leasing groups for 496 passenger jets worth $75bn. Boeing obtained orders and commitments for 201 aircraft worth $40bn
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FirstGroup CEO pay award irks shareholders

Wed, 2014-07-16 13:22
One-third vote against doubling CEO’s remuneration comes as shareholders increasingly protest big pay packets
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Japanese initiative launched to develop next-generation sustainable aviation biofuel sector by 2020

Tue, 2014-07-15 10:39
Tue 15 July 2014 - Japan has become the latest country to launch a government-backed initiative to investigate the potential of developing a domestic sustainable aviation biofuel industry. Over 30 companies and organisations from the aerospace, fuel, engineering, finance and research sectors have formed a group called Initiatives for Next Generation Aviation Fuels (INAF) to plan a roadmap towards using nationally sourced aviation biofuels by 2020, when the Olympic and Paralympic Games are to be held in Tokyo. Japan Airlines, All Nippon Airways, Nippon Cargo Airlines and Boeing are among the INAF members. Japan Airlines and Boeing partnered in one of the first demonstration biofuel flights back in January 2009, which was made up of camelina, jatropha and algae blended by Honeywell UOP and supplied by Nikki-Universal, a Japanese joint venture of UOP and JGC Corporation, both members of INAF.
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News and Updates - NextGen Technology Transferred from NASA to FAA

Mon, 2014-07-14 17:58

July 14NextGen software technology that will allow air traffic controllers to maximize the benefits of Performance Based Navigation (PBN) procedures on the approach to the runway is being transferred to the FAA from NASA today in an official ceremony at FAA headquarters.

Coupled with the precision of PBN, the technology, called Terminal Sequence and Spacing, provides predictability, allowing controllers to safely reduce excess spacing between approaching aircraft, saving time and fuel while reducing emissions.

The technology uses time-based metering to improve the safety and efficiency of Area Navigation (RNAV) and Required Navigation Performance (RNP) approach procedures in terminal airspace.

The airport-centric Terminal Sequence and Spacing technology dovetails with an existing traffic metering tool that delivers efficiencies in the airspace beyond the airport. Time-Based Flow Management, which improves the flow of traffic through high altitude, en route airspace down to the four corner posts, navigational fixes in the sky approximately 40 miles from an airport. Terminal Sequence and Spacing helps controllers manage aircraft from the four corner posts down to the runway.

With the new technology, controllers see circles called slot markers on their display screens that indicate where an aircraft should be in order to fly a RNAV or RNP route through the forecasted wind field, meet all speed and altitude restrictions and land on time. This software enables the use of PBN procedures to become more routine, requiring less vectoring, fewer level-offs of aircraft and less communication between controllers and pilots.

The FAA, which received an initial technology transfer of Terminal Sequence and Spacing from NASA last September, is expected to make a full investment decision by the end of the year through its Joint Resources Council, a team of top agency executives that reviews major acquisitions and approves funding.

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As Australia repeals carbon tax, Qantas removes its domestic flight surcharge but says fares won't drop

Mon, 2014-07-14 11:37
Mon 14 July 2014 - Ahead of a move that would make Australia the first country in the world to remove a legislated price on carbon, Qantas said it has officially dropped the carbon surcharge it introduced on domestic fares in 2012. The repeal of the carbon tax by the incoming Australian coalition government was expected to have been voted through by now but ran into problems when one minority party removed its support, insisting that industries paying the tax had to pass on the saving to consumers, a stipulation that now appears to have been accepted and the legislation is expected to be approved within days. However, the airline, which had a carbon liability in its 2012-13 financial year of A$106 million ($100m), says its attempts to pass on the tax to customers failed due to strong competition in the domestic market and so fares will not be reduced. Rival Virgin Australia says it too had been unable to recover the costs of the carbon tax for similar reasons and would also not be lowering fares as a result.
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The 21st century promises era of radical change, but no rocket belts

Sun, 2014-07-13 05:02
It is easy to feel that the pace of development in aviation has slowed
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The 21st century promises era of radical change, but no rocket belts

Sun, 2014-07-13 05:02
It is easy to feel that the pace of development in aviation has slowed
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The 21st century promises era of radical change, but no rocket belts

Sun, 2014-07-13 05:02
It is easy to feel that the pace of development in aviation has slowed
Categories:

The 21st century promises era of radical change, but no rocket belts

Sun, 2014-07-13 05:02
It is easy to feel that the pace of development in aviation has slowed
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Brazil's GOL to start international flights using newly-certified Amyris/Total renewable jet fuel

Fri, 2014-07-11 15:28
Fri 11 July 2014 - Less than a month after approval for commercial use by fuel certification body ASTM International, Brazilian carrier GOL has announced it is to begin flying with blended farnesane renewable jet fuel developed by the Amyris/Total partnership. The sugarcane-derived Synthetic Iso-Paraffin (SIP) fuel will be produced in Brazil and used in blends of up to 10 per cent on flights between Florida and Sao Paulo starting later this month. As the Brazilian fuel regulator has yet to transcribe the revised ASTM standard on SIP fuels, which may take a further three months, the Amyris/Total fuel blend can only be used on inbound GOL flights until passed. When produced on a fully sustainable basis, the two companies claim farnesane can reduce greenhouse gas emissions by up to 80 per cent on a lifecycle basis compared to traditional petroleum fuels.
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