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China’s transportation-sector CO2 emissions more than doubled from 2000 to 2010 and are projected to increase by another 54 percent by 2020 from 2010 levels. For China to meet its 2020 target to reduce economy-wide carbon intensity by 17 percent in 2015 from 2010 levels, the growth in emissions must be approximately cut in half.

Led by the Ministry of Environmental Protection (MEP) and the Ministry of Industry and Information Technology (MIIT), the nation is taking steps to make that happen. Phase III of China’s light duty vehicle fuel consumption regulations includes its first-ever standards for fleet average fuel consumption, which will reduce fuel consumption to 7 L/100km by 2015, a 13 percent improvement of new fleet vehicles between 2008 and 2015. Phase IV standards are under development. For heavy duty vehicles, China is in the process of developing Phase 1 standards, expected for 2015–2020.

China also faces challenges related to conventional pollutants and air quality. Annual average concentrations of coarse particulate matter (PM10) nationwide are at 98 µg/m3, which exceeds the World Health Organization ambient air quality standard by a factor of five. All 29 Chinese cities for which ground-based measurements are reported experience levels of air pollution at least double the recommended WHO standard.

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2017 Global update: Light-duty vehicle greenhouse gas and fuel economy standards
Examines how the greenhouse gas and fuel economy standards have changed over time, how the auto industry in different regions has reacted, and discusses how the standards may evolve in the future.
Report
International competitiveness and the auto industry: What's the role of motor vehicle emission standards?
Reviews the political science, regulatory, and economics literature to illuminate the international competitiveness impacts of motor vehicle emission standards.
Briefing
Cost-benefit assessment of proposed China 6 emission standard for new light-duty vehicles
Estimates health benefits and technology upgrade costs of the proposed standard and implementation timetable focusing mainly on nationwide impacts, but also separately analyzes China’s three key regions: the so-called Jing-Jin-...
Working paper
 

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The Staff

Anup Bandivadekar
Anup Bandivadekar
Program Director / India Lead
Jessica Chu
Jessica Chu
Office Manager & Assistant to the CPO
Hui He
Hui He
Senior Policy Analyst / China Lead
Ray Minjares
Ray Minjares
Clean Air Lead