initiatives / Clean Air

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Motor vehicle emissions harm public health and the environment. The ICCT estimates that exposure to vehicle emissions in the year 2005 produced at least 242,000 global early deaths. Emissions of fine particulate matter, ozone-precursors, air toxics and other harmful pollutants also produce environmental damage in the form of crop fertility losses and near-term climate warming.
 

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Recently Released

Impacts of world class vehicle efficiency and emissions regulations in select G20 countries
Characterizes the climate and health benefits of adopting world-class standards for new vehicle efficiency/CO2 and conventional pollutant emissions in all members of the G20 Transport Task Group.
Report
Evaluation of emission-control scenarios for agricultural tractors and construction equipment
Evaluates alternative regulatory pathways for India’s agricultural tractors and construction equipment on the basis of air pollutant emissions.
Working paper
A global strategy to introduce low-sulfur fuels and cleaner diesel vehicles
Presents a global strategy to reduce fine particulate (PM2.5) and black carbon emissions from the global fleet of on-road diesel vehicles by identifying 36 countries for immediate action.
Consulting report
 

From the ICCT Blogs

The better path for the US auto industry is more efficiency technology, not less
Strong standards with long regulatory lead-times are pillars of good energy, technology, and industrial policy. Our research suggests that the better path—for technology investments, consumers, and the environment—is to keep driving forward.
Staff Blog
A surprising key to unlocking the electric vehicle market: Utilities
One increasingly important – and perhaps unexpected – leader in the quest to figure things out may be your local electric power utility. Utilities are starting to see how the flexibility of electric vehicles can turn them into an asset for making the grid more efficient and profitable.
Staff Blog
Quibbles over the perfect way to measure black carbon emissions from ships are keeping us from commonsense moves to control them
Without regulation, it’s unlikely that the international maritime shipping sector will voluntarily find ways to cut black carbon emissions, despite the climate benefit. Thus, we need to move on from quibbling about the “perfect” measurement method and start debating the opportunities to cut black carbon control emissions. But we must move quickly. Because the Arctic we’re aiming to protect can’t keep its cool much longer.
Staff Blog