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This update adds one new data source, for a total of 14, covering 16 years, eight countries, and approximately 1.1 million cars. The analysis shows that, in the EU, the gap between official and real-world CO2 emission values continues to grow—from 9% in 2001 to 42% in 2016.

Investigates the gap between real-world and official CO2 emission values in the four largest vehicle markets in the world: China, the EU, Japan, and the United States. The analysis shows that the gap has increased in all markets since 2001. 

A synopsis of key findings from previous ICCT studies relevant to a 2025–2030 standard in the EU, including technology potential and associated compliance cost, the role of electrified vehicles, and the switch to a new emissions testing procedure.

2017.11.05

This update adds one new data source, for a total of 14, covering 16 years, eight countries, and approximately 1.1 million cars. The analysis shows that, in the EU, the gap between official and real-world CO2 emission values continues to grow—from 9% in 2001 to 42% in 2016.

Publication: White paper
2017.11.05

Investigates the gap between real-world and official CO2 emission values in the four largest vehicle markets in the world: China, the EU, Japan, and the United States. The analysis shows that the gap has increased in all markets since 2001. 

Publication: White paper
2017.10.26

A synopsis of key findings from previous ICCT studies relevant to a 2025–2030 standard in the EU, including technology potential and associated compliance cost, the role of electrified vehicles, and the switch to a new emissions testing procedure.

Publication: Briefing
2017.10.23
[This post originally appeared on the TRUE initiative website, www.trueinitiative.org, 16 Oct 2017]
Blog Post
2017.10.23
[This post originally appeared on the TRUE initiative website, www.trueinitiative.org, on 17 Oct 201
Blog Post
2017.10.12

Addresses several common misconceptions about light-duty vehicle fuel efficiency and greenhouse gas standards and focuses on Australia’s proposed light-vehicle CO2 standards and the effects they may or may not have on Australian motorists.

Publication: Briefing
2017.10.10

Finds that for cars, the cost for meeting a 2025 target value of 70 g/km (as measured in the New European Driving Cycle - NEDC) is between 250 and 500 euros higher than would be the case in a footprint-based CO2 target system.

Publication: White paper

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