where we work / United States

Translate

With nearly 250 million light duty vehicles on the road, the United States has the largest vehicle fleet in the world, and annual new vehicle sales second only to China.

Despite its historical role in pioneering vehicle regulations, from the mid-1980s until very recently the U.S. lagged behind other developed nations in passenger vehicle fuel economy standards and emissions regulations (see the global PV standards update), with higher levels of CO2 emissions per mile, higher average fuel consumption, and lower average fuel economy. However, since 2009 the United States has adopted aggressive legislation that could make the country a global leader in fuel efficiency and GHG emissions control. And market demand for fuel-efficient gasoline, hybrid, and electric vehicles is growing.

Featured Work

Events

SEE ALL EVENTS

Recently Released

Transparency of data in the regulation of vehicle emissions in the European Union and United States
Legal brief summarizing public access to vehicle emissions data in the European Union and United States.
Consultant report
A roadmap for heavy-duty engine CO2 standards within the European Union framework
Analyzes the benefits of establishing separate engine CO2 standards in addition to full-vehicle regulations to specifically drive improvements in heavy-duty engine efficiency. Outlines a possible pathway for the development and...
Briefing
Low-carbon technology pathways for soot-free urban bus fleets in 20 megacities
Evaluates well-to-wheel greenhouse gas emissions from soot-free urban transit bus types in 20 megacities.
Working paper
 

From the ICCT Blogs

Italy’s car market needs to make a U-turn
Between minuscule electric vehicle (EV) sales, growing diesel shares, and Italian carmakers’ struggle to curb carbon dioxide (CO2) and nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions, there is no doubt that Italy is heading in the wrong direction, but it’s not too late for a U-turn.
Staff Blog
Why (Run on) Less is more…
Run on Less is more evidence that cost-effective, high-efficiency trucks are on the road today and only getting better.
Staff Blog
Will the future RDE regulation be enough to restore trust in diesel technology?
The success of the RDE regulation will depend on the will of manufacturers to prove that they have learned a lesson from Dieselgate by beginning to focus on reducing real-world emissions, not just on passing a particular test.
Staff Blog

The Staff

John German
John German
Senior Fellow / US Co-Lead
Nic Lutsey
Nic Lutsey
Program Director / US Co-Lead
Peter Slowik
Peter Slowik
Associate Researcher