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With nearly 250 million light duty vehicles on the road, the United States has the largest vehicle fleet in the world, and annual new vehicle sales second only to China.

Despite its historical role in pioneering vehicle regulations, from the mid-1980s until very recently the U.S. lagged behind other developed nations in passenger vehicle fuel economy standards and emissions regulations (see the global PV standards update), with higher levels of CO2 emissions per mile, higher average fuel consumption, and lower average fuel economy. However, since 2009 the United States has adopted aggressive legislation that could make the country a global leader in fuel efficiency and GHG emissions control. And market demand for fuel-efficient gasoline, hybrid, and electric vehicles is growing.

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Recently Released

Expanding the electric vehicle market in U.S. cities
Assesses the U.S. electric vehicle market and the factors that are driving it. Catalogues electric vehicle promotion activities. Identifies best practice policies in the 50 most populous U.S. metropolitan areas. Conducts a...
White paper
Diesel Technology Developments
Highlights important innovations and trends in diesel engines and emission control systems, some of which were not considered when the 2025 CAFE and greenhouse gas standards were finalized, yet promise to improve diesel...
Briefing
Diesel Engines
Diesel engines, aftertreatment, and emissions control have developed since 2012, improving diesel vehicles’ cost-effectiveness, particularly for larger passenger vehicle classes.
Working paper
 

News

News

From the ICCT Blogs

Maximizing aircraft fuel efficiency: Make sure the economics add up
Richard Golaszewski's insights on what a successful clean-sheet aircraft program looks like—from research and development to sales, what made it successful, and what makes sense for manufacturers and airlines today to repeat that success.
Staff Blog
The IMO just took a significant step toward reducing the use of heavy fuel oil in the Arctic
The IMO will consider concrete proposals on ways to reduce the risks of HFO at the next meeting of its Marine Environment Protection Committee, MEPC 72 in April 2018. A decision on what should be done to mitigate the risks of HFO could come as early as 2019.
Staff Blog
Where does the U.S. stand on biofuels now?
The messages on cost, greenhouse gas emissions, and latitude in interpreting the statute may not be entirely consistent, but one thing is clear: U.S. EPA is now intent on dialing down RFS obligations, and that is a real change.
Staff Blog

The Staff

John German
John German
Senior Fellow / US Co-Lead
Nic Lutsey
Nic Lutsey
Program Director / US Co-Lead
Peter Slowik
Peter Slowik
Associate Researcher