Staff blog: Compliance and Enforcement

2017.07.03
On June 26, the BMVI finally published the CO2 measurement results we had been waiting for. But in the interim the Ministry re-tested 29 of the original vehicle models. Only a subset of those results, data on 19 out of the 29, was published and in many cases, the vehicles show lower CO2 emissions during the retest than according to their official type-approval value. Those are impressively good results—and strikingly different than the initial results from 2016.
2017.05.30
Policy adjustments, created largely in response to the high-profile subsidy fraud scandal, mark major reforms for China’s EV market. As an old Chinese saying goes, “A loss may turn out to be a gain.” After being struck by this scandal, China’s EV market may find the right path toward a prosperous future.
2017.05.16
European governments have strong incentives to discourage diesel technology and national governments could face fines for failing to meet ambient air quality standards for NOx. As a result, several cities are moving fast to phase out diesel cars, which account for 80% of all NOx emissions from vehicles in Europe.
2017.02.10
PSA has admitted to changing emission control calibrations under normal driving—but denies using banned engine software. The gaming of defeat device regulations has gone on for far too long in the EU. It's time for the charade to stop.
2017.01.30
The current investigations might not prove that Fiat-Chrysler or Renault-Nissan used defeat devices per se, but these recalls confirm that automakers can do more than just the minimum necessary to comply with the letter of the law and reduce emissions in real-world conditions.
2016.06.15
Opel admits to reducing vehicle emission controls based on conditions other than ambient temperature or restart. Opel says its “engines are in compliance” in Europe. But, once again, they would not be legal in the US, and the difference is instructive.

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