Latin America

Latin America

Latin America can be overshadowed on the global transportation policy stage by the United States, Europe, China, and India, with their highly publicized challenges with urban air quality and their high-profile roles in global debates on climate change policy. But Brazil is the fourth largest vehicle market in the world and an important factor in the global biofuels industry. Mexico is also a major global market, and the region as a whole has a key role in the world energy economy. Countries in the region may, by virtue of the very fact that they do differ from those larger economies, offer valuable insights into effective policymaking for similar-size countries in Africa and Asia; Chile, with its innovative feebate program to promote passenger-vehicle efficiency, is an example.

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About the program

Latin America can be overshadowed on the global transportation policy stage by the United States, Europe, China, and India, with their highly publicized challenges with urban air quality and their high-profile roles in global debates on climate change policy. But Brazil is the fourth largest vehicle market in the world and an important factor in the global biofuels industry. Mexico is also a major global market, and the region as a whole has a key role in the world energy economy. Countries in the region may, by virtue of the very fact that they do differ from those larger economies, offer valuable insights into effective policymaking for similar-size countries in Africa and Asia; Chile, with its innovative feebate program to promote passenger-vehicle efficiency, is an example.

ICCT staff work in Brazil, Mexico, and other key vehicle markets in Latin America to adapt international best practices to the local economic and policy context. In Brazil we support governmental agencies including the Ministry of Environment (MMA), São Paulo's Environmental Agency (CETESB), and the Ministry of Development, Industry and Foreign Trade (MDIC), filling technical gaps toward more advanced vehicle emissions, fuel quality, and sustainable freight and mobility policies. In Mexico, we work closely with the Secretaría de Medio Ambiente y Recursos Naturales (SEMARNAT, the regulatory body charged with setting vehicle emissions standards), and with the Instituto Nacional de Ecología (INE), which provides technical analysis on environmental policy issues. In Argentina, Chile and Colombia ICCT research is providing essential technical foundations for development of vehicle emissions and fuel efficiency standards, incentives towards ultra clean buses, market-based approaches such as green freight programs, and innovative fiscal policies.

[Interview] The state of air quality and diesel emissions control in Mexico

Kate Blumberg, ICCT senior fellow and Mexico program lead, on clean air policy and vehicle emissions in Mexico.

Recent publications

Expanding and aligning green freight programs in Latin America

Presents the proceedings of the of the "Latin America Workshop on Green Freight Programs" held in the city of Buenos Aires, Argentina on June 2017. During the three-day event, government officials, industry representatives, and experts discussed and identified challenges, opportunities, potential solutions and next steps to promote the development of green freight programs in Latin America.

2017.10.23 | Workshop report
Financing the transition to soot-free urban bus fleets in 20 megacities

Addresses the opportunities for facilitating, and the barriers to financing, the transition to soot-free urban bus fleets in 20 megacities.

2017.10.11 | Report
International comparison of Brazilian regulatory standards for light-duty vehicle emissions

Informs the next phase of PROCONVE for LD vehicles by assessing important components of PROCONVE L6 and their relative strengths and weaknesses compared with similar programs in the U.S. and the EU.

2017.04.14 | White paper
See all publications

Staff blog

Zero emission buses are worth reaching for, but emission performance standards are the low-hanging fruit

Sales of battery electric buses are surging, yet a complete technology transition won't happen overnight. Meanwhile, tightening emission standards on conventionally powered buses would have immediate benefits for air quality in many of the world's fastest growing megacities.

Staff