programs / Heavy-duty vehicles

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The steady growth in freight transport by truck presents a challenge to efforts at reducing hazardous air pollution and greenhouse gas emissions. Though most countries have fuel economy standards for passenger vehicles, as of 2011 only Japan and the United States have set efficiency and GHG emission standards for heavy-duty vehicles.

Most heavy-duty vehicles are powered by diesel engines that, without pollution controls, can emit high levels of other pollutants that contribute to global warming  and local air pollution.  For example, uncontrolled diesel vehicles produce high levels of particulate matter, a fraction of which has a warming effect, and nitrogen oxides, which are an ingredient of ozone (also known as smog), an important greenhouse gas. These pollutants are associated with bronchitis, asthma, and other lung diseases, and are responsible for millions of premature deaths worldwide. In 2013, the World Health Organization classified diesel exhaust as carcinogenic to humans, based on evidence of an increase in lung cancer after long-term exposure.

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Impacts of world class vehicle efficiency and emissions regulations in select G20 countries
Characterizes the climate and health benefits of adopting world-class standards for new vehicle efficiency/CO2 and conventional pollutant emissions in all members of the G20 Transport Task Group.
Report
NOx emissions from heavy-duty and light-duty diesel vehicles in the EU: Comparison of real-world performance and current type-approval requirements
Identifies key differences in the regulations governing certification of NOx emissions from diesel cars (Euro 6) and trucks (Euro VI) that help explain differences in their real-world emissions performance. Ultimately, an...
Briefing
European vehicle market statistics, 2016/2017
Annual statistical portrait of technologies, fuel consumption, and GHG and pollutant emissions in Europe's passenger car, light-commercial, and heavy-duty fleets.
Report
 

From the ICCT Blogs

Lessons learned from Sweden’s electric vehicle rollercoaster
Although the Swedish government is planning to introduce a feebate program in 2018, which will likely bring an end to the EV market rollercoaster, other countries can learn a valuable lesson from the Swedish rebate program: dependable policies are key to steady EV market growth.
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Why are EU manufacturers claiming their defeat devices are not defeat devices?
PSA has admitted to changing emission control calibrations under normal driving—but denies using banned engine software. The gaming of defeat device regulations has gone on for far too long in the EU. It's time for the charade to stop.
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No, fuel economy standards do not put a million US jobs at risk
Ford CEO Mark Fields has to know that the US fuel-economy rules are already designed to “align with market reality.” Maybe he doesn't know that a study he's relying on for his numbers is discreditable.
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The Staff

Yoann Bernard
Yoann Bernard
Real World Emissions Researcher
Oscar Delgado
Oscar Delgado
Senior Researcher
Jan Dornoff
Jan Dornoff
Vehicle Emissions Senior Researcher
Fanta Kamakaté
Fanta Kamakaté
Chief Program Officer
Nic Lutsey
Nic Lutsey
Program Director / US Co-Lead
Rachel Muncrief
Rachel Muncrief
Heavy-Duty Vehicles Lead
Benjamin Sharpe
Benjamin Sharpe
Senior Researcher / Canada Lead