programs / Heavy-duty vehicles

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The steady growth in freight transport by truck presents a challenge to efforts at reducing hazardous air pollution and greenhouse gas emissions. Though most countries have fuel economy standards for passenger vehicles, as of 2011 only Japan and the United States have set efficiency and GHG emission standards for heavy-duty vehicles.

Most heavy-duty vehicles are powered by diesel engines that, without pollution controls, can emit high levels of other pollutants that contribute to global warming  and local air pollution.  For example, uncontrolled diesel vehicles produce high levels of particulate matter, a fraction of which has a warming effect, and nitrogen oxides, which are an ingredient of ozone (also known as smog), an important greenhouse gas. These pollutants are associated with bronchitis, asthma, and other lung diseases, and are responsible for millions of premature deaths worldwide. In 2013, the World Health Organization classified diesel exhaust as carcinogenic to humans, based on evidence of an increase in lung cancer after long-term exposure.

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Recently Released

Status of policies for clean vehicles and fuels in select G20 countries
Reveals that the efforts made by multiple Transport Task Group (TTG) countries to promote and support policies and programs—including stringent tailpipe emissions standards, fuel economy standards, low sulfur fuels, and green...
Briefing
Certification of CO2 emissions and fuel consumption of on-road heavy-duty vehicles in the European Union
Summarizes provisions of the implementing act adopted in May 2017 by the European Union for  type-approval of CO2 emissions and fuel consumption of on-road heavy-duty vehicles, which will go into effect in 2019 and 2020.
Policy update
Market analysis and fuel efficiency technology potential of heavy-duty vehicles in China
Examines the HDV market in China and investigates the potential for currently sold vehicles to reduce fuel consumption through the adoption of known efficiency technologies. 
White paper
 

From the ICCT Blogs

Maximizing aircraft fuel efficiency: Don’t skimp on R&D
An interview with Dr. Fay Collier, Associate Director for Flight Strategy, Integrated Aviation Systems Program at NASA Aeronautics and a former Project Manager at NASA Environmentally Responsible Aviation (ERA), on NASA’s contribution to technologies already in use on aircraft flying now, the ERA project, and a new NASA initiative to demonstrate these environmentally responsible aviation technologies. 
Staff Blog
New energy efficiency target for cars could help Brazil compete in international markets
Aligning Brazil's new-car efficiency target with the European Union’s target would have substantial benefits for consumers. Compared to a car meeting Inovar-Auto's 2017 target, the average new car sold in 2023 could reduce fuel costs more than 4,000 USD over the lifetime of the vehicle, equivalent to 2.4 times the cost of additional vehicle technology.
Staff Blog
Maximizing aircraft fuel efficiency: Engines matter
A conversation with Dr. Meyer (Mike) J. Benzakein on the importance of developing fuel efficient engines.
Staff Blog

The Staff

Yoann Bernard
Yoann Bernard
Real World Emissions Researcher
Oscar Delgado
Oscar Delgado
Senior Researcher
Jan Dornoff
Jan Dornoff
Vehicle Emissions Senior Researcher
Ulises Hernández
Ulises Hernández
Green Freight Researcher
Fanta Kamakaté
Fanta Kamakaté
Chief Program Officer
Nic Lutsey
Nic Lutsey
Program Director / US Co-Lead
Benjamin Sharpe
Benjamin Sharpe
Senior Researcher / Canada Lead