programs / Heavy-duty vehicles

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The steady growth in freight transport by truck presents a challenge to efforts at reducing hazardous air pollution and greenhouse gas emissions. Though most countries have fuel economy standards for passenger vehicles, as of 2011 only Japan and the United States have set efficiency and GHG emission standards for heavy-duty vehicles.

Most heavy-duty vehicles are powered by diesel engines that, without pollution controls, can emit high levels of other pollutants that contribute to global warming  and local air pollution.  For example, uncontrolled diesel vehicles produce high levels of particulate matter, a fraction of which has a warming effect, and nitrogen oxides, which are an ingredient of ozone (also known as smog), an important greenhouse gas. These pollutants are associated with bronchitis, asthma, and other lung diseases, and are responsible for millions of premature deaths worldwide. In 2013, the World Health Organization classified diesel exhaust as carcinogenic to humans, based on evidence of an increase in lung cancer after long-term exposure.

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Recently Released

Market analysis of heavy-duty commercial trailers in Canada
Analyzes the new trailer sales market and also interviewed a variety of experts from the trucking industry in Canada in order to estimate typical ownership cycles and activity rates for various types of trailers.
Working paper
Impacts of world class vehicle efficiency and emissions regulations in select G20 countries
Characterizes the climate and health benefits of adopting world-class standards for new vehicle efficiency/CO2 and conventional pollutant emissions in all members of the G20 Transport Task Group.
Report
NOx emissions from heavy-duty and light-duty diesel vehicles in the EU: Comparison of real-world performance and current type-approval requirements
Identifies key differences in the regulations governing certification of NOx emissions from diesel cars (Euro 6) and trucks (Euro VI) that help explain differences in their real-world emissions performance. Ultimately, an...
Briefing
 

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The Staff

Yoann Bernard
Yoann Bernard
Real World Emissions Researcher
Oscar Delgado
Oscar Delgado
Senior Researcher
Jan Dornoff
Jan Dornoff
Vehicle Emissions Senior Researcher
Ulises Hernández
Ulises Hernández
Green Freight Researcher
Fanta Kamakaté
Fanta Kamakaté
Chief Program Officer
Nic Lutsey
Nic Lutsey
Program Director / US Co-Lead
Benjamin Sharpe
Benjamin Sharpe
Senior Researcher / Canada Lead